Home » Gate Guarding » Warp Not, Weft Not

Warp Not, Weft Not

After reading last nights’ post, a friend said my first knitting endeavor looked kind of like The 10 Commandments. Although I’m sure God was less distracted and His rows were very even, I have continued to learn some lessons from knitting.

I’ve looked at a lot of web sites and knitting blogs. I’ve learned that pearl is spelled purl. And I’ve learned that the world is full of overachieving knitters.

I watched a video of a guy knitting while playing the drums. I’ve read about people who wear port-a-pocket pouches so they can knit while walking on the treadmill or jogging.

Considering the troubles I have just putting down my needles and walking to the door, I’ve ruled that one out.

I’ve read multiple confessions of people who knit while they drink and of those who knit while they drive, although no one admitted to knitting while drinking and driving.

I found this book to be particularly Texas appropriate. This is considered a classic among knitters, proving that real men do knit. I ‘m pretty sure if I tried this (the knitting while riding a horse part) it would give new meaning to Back in the Saddle Again and again and again.

I loved the saying I read on one guy’s t-shirt: Man enough to knit. Strong enough to purl. Haven’t seen any of those here at the drill site yet.

I found out that there’s a technique called psso where you slip a stitch and pass over it to create a hole. For some knitters, this is a skill and they do it on purpose.

For me, it comes naturally and at the most unexpected times.

I often slip stitches, making holes. I usually don’t realize I’ve dropped a stitch until 10 or 15 rows later. Sometimes I unravel row after row and make it right.

This takes a me quite a long time since I can hardly get the little loops back on the needle before they drop down a few more rows, kind of like a knitting version of Tetris.

Usually I just take a small piece of yarn, pass it through the hole, and tie it in a knot on the back side. It’s a little unconventional. I don’t think there’s a name for this technique.

The second thing I made was a scarf for Henry. It didn’t start out to be a scarf  for Henry, but I cast on too many stitches and only had 1 skein of yarn.

Henry is the only one small enough for such a short scarf.

As you can see, it’s actually more like a dog-shawl, kind of wide for a scarf. I  think there’s a lesson in proportions here somewhere.

Uncertain about what to make next, I decided on little squares.

I have no idea why. I guess it just seemed like there’d be less to unravel.

I made a good number of these, 20 maybe.

Then I realized I don’t know how to whipstitch and all the edges are so tight I can’t really see any way to fasten them together.

Undaunted, I continued to make new little squares, each with a different knit/purl pattern. There are other stitches like the warp and the weft.  I have no idea what they are so I’m sticking with knit and purl.

Clearly, I’m an under-acheiving knitter.

I’m perfectly happy with my knitting.

Maybe eventually I’ll get restless and decide to make something other than long rows and little squares. Until then, I’m content.

I’ve decided it’s OK to do things for the pure pleasure of the moment without having a single thing to show for it. That’s a bit radical for me, but I’m liking it.

I’m not ashamed to say that I joyfully knit nothing.

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8 thoughts on “Warp Not, Weft Not

  1. So, in trying to follow your endeavor I researched the following (and decided that my fun house bound activity of trying to become a gourmet cook doesn’t even rival your pleasure quest other than I also have not a single thing to show for it. Maybe your squares could be my pot holders 🙂 Dual purpose, or does that ruin the “for pure pleasure of the moment?”) :

    “inch(es)( )work instructions between parentheses, in the place directed[ ]work instructions between brackets, as many times as directed*repeat instructions following the single asterisk as directed* *repeat instructions between asterisks, as directedaltalternateapproxapproximatelybegbegin(ning)betbetweenBObind offview continental video view english video CAcolor ACBcolor BCCcontrasting colorcddcentered double decrease. sl2 tog, K1, pass the slipped stitches over (together)view english video view continental video chchain (using crochet hook). Start with a slip knot.view video cmcentimeter(s)cncable needle: short knitting needle, used as an aid in the twisting of a cable.COcast onview video contcontinuecross 2 Lcross 2 stitches to the left (to work a cable). Slip 2 stitches p-wise onto a cable needle, let cable needle hang in front of work as you knit the next couple of stiches; then knit stitches off of cable needle.cross 2 Rcross 2 stitches to the right (to work a cable). slip 2 stitches p-wise onto a cable needle, let cable needle hang in back of work as you knit the next couple of stiches; then knit stitches off of cable needle.dcdouble crochetdec(s)decrease(s)DKDouble Knitting weight yarn. Slightly finer than worsted weight.dpn aka dpdouble pointed needle(s). A short needle with points at both ends, used in sets or 4 or 5, for knitting in the round.EONend of needleEORend of rowFCfront cross (in working a cable)flfront loop(s)follfollow; follows; followingg aka grgramg stgarter stitchgrp(s)group(s)hdchalf double crochethkhookin(s)inch(es)inc(s)increase(s)inclincludingkknitview continental video view english video k tbl aka K1 tbl, K1bKnit stitch through the back loopview continental video view english video k-bknit stitch in row below. (Infrequently used for knit through the back loop; see K tbl)view continental video view english video k-wiseknit-wise. Insert right needle into the stitch as if to knit itk1 f&b aka kfbknit 1 stitch in the front, then in the back. This is also called a Bar Increaseview english video view continental video k2togknit 2 stitches togetherview english video view continental video k2tog tblknit 2 stitches together, through the back loopsview english video view continental video kllknit left loop. An increaseview english video view continental video krlknit right loop. An increaseview english video view continental video LCleft cross (to work a cable). As in: cross 2 LLHleft handlp(s)loop(s)LTleft twist (where two stitches cross each other, as in the smallest cable stitch possible)mmeter(s)M1Make 1. This means to increase a stitch. If the method isn’t specified, use whichever increase you like, for instance M1F.M1Amake 1 away. An Increaseview english video view continental video M1L aka M1, M1Fmake 1 (front)(left). An increase. From the front, lift loop between stitches with left needle, knit into back of loopview continental video view english video M1R aka M1Bmake 1 (back) (right). An increase. From the back, lift loop between stitches with left needle, knit into front of loopview continental video view english video M1Tmake 1 towards. An Increaseview english video view continental video MBmake bobblemcmain colormmmillimeters(s)nonumberozounce(s)ppurlview english video view continental video p tbl aka P1 tbl, P1bpurl through the back loopview continental video view english video p-bpurl stitch in the row below. (infrequently used to mean purl stitch in the back loop; see p tbl)view continental video view english video p-wisepurl wise: Insert right needle down into the front loop, or up into the back loop for tblp1 f&b aka pfbpurl the front of a stitch, then purl the back of the same stitchview english video view continental video p2togpurl 2 togetherview continental video view english video p2tog tblpurl 2 together through the back loopsview english video view continental video pat(s) aka patt(s)pattern(s)pmplace markerpnsopass next stitch overpoppopcorn stitchprevpreviouspssopass the slipped stitch over (as in slip 1, knit 1, psso)pupick up stitchesview video RCright cross (to work a cable), as in: cross 2 Rremremainingreprepeat(s)rev St stReverse stockinette/stocking stitch. The “purl” side of plain, stockinette stitch. Purled on RS, knitted on WSRHright handribribbing: vertical columns of knit and purl stitches, side by side, as in K1, P1 ribbingrnd(s)round(s). In circular knitting, a “row” is called a “round.”RSright side, for instance the outside of a sweater. Stated to indicate which side is facing you when carrying out instructionsRTright twist (where two stitches cross each other, as in the smallest cable stitch possible)scsingle crochetskskipsk2pslip1, knit 2 tog, pass slipped stitch over. (a double decrease)view english video view continental video SKP aka skpo”Slip, Knit, Pass.” Slip a stitch, knit the next stitch, pass the slipped stitch over the knit one. The same as: sl1, k1, pssoview continental video view english video sl aka sslip a stitch. If they don’t specify, slip the stitch purl-wise….Unless you are decreasing: then, slip it knit-wise on the knit rows, and purl-wise on the purl rows. (According to Vogue Knitting)sl stslip stitch(es)sl1, k1, pssoslip1, knit1, pass the slipped stitch over. The same as SKPview english video view continental video sl1k aka sl 1 k-wiseslip a stitch knit-wiseview continental video view english video sl1p aka sl 1 p-wiseslip a stitch purl-wiseview continental video view english video slip knotan adjustable loop, used to begin many cast-on methodsview video sp(s)space(s)ssslip stitch (Canadian)sskslip, slip, knit slipped stitches tog. A decreaseview continental video view english video ssk (improved)sl 1, sl 1 p-wise, knit slipped sts togview english video view continental video sspslip, slip, purl. A decrease, usually done on the purl-sideview continental video ssskslip, slip, slip, knit 3 slipped stitches together. A double decreaseview continental video view english video st (s)stitch(es)St stStockinette/Stocking stitchtblthrough the back looptogtogetherwonwool over needlewrnwool round needleWSwrong side, for instance the inside of the sweater. Stated to indicate which side is facing you when carrying out instructionswyibwith yarn in backwyifwith yarn in frontyb aka ybkyarn to the backyd(s)yard(s)yfonyarn forward and over needle. Same as yoyfrnyarn forward and ’round needle. Same as yoyfwd aka yfyarn forwardyoyarn over: wrap the yarn around right needleview continental video view english video yo2 aka yo twiceyarn over twiceyonyarn over needle. Same as yoyrnyarn ’round needle. Same as yo

    • Cuz – OK, now I’m completely intimidated. I don’t have a clue what you just wrote. You can REALLY cook, I really can’t knit. Did you just send me a pattern? You’re too funny!

  2. Just have to say i love your blog. Have been a reader for a while now. When you started on knitting, I can so identify. But I don’t do it anymore. Miss seeing you two. May some day come to your gate.

    • Wow! What a happy surprise to see your name pop up, Kay! 😀 I had no idea you read Fork. Miss you, too! We’d love to see you at our gate! I’d recommend anytime that isn’t summer, which in Texas begins April 1st and, I’m told, ends sometime in October. Supposed to be 98 here Monday!

    • John, didn’t you read the book cover? Knitting is a manly art! There is a Rocky Mountain Men’s Knitting Retreat coming up that you might want to look into. These guys are amazing! 😉

  3. I’ve decided it’s OK to do things for the pure pleasure of the moment without having a single thing to show for it. That’s a bit radical for me, but I’m liking it.

    I’m not ashamed to say that I joyfully knit nothing.

    I love it!

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